The twittersphere is alive with cries of ecstasy over the Alexander McQueen exhibition Savage Beauty starting today, this Saturday (14th March) at the Victoria & Albert, which I’ll be going to in April. Who, you might ask? I would have said that once. But having gone to the exhibition on the style icon Isabella Blow last year I know he was an extraordinary designer whose clothes were nearer to art rather than utility and wearability – not that I’ve ever tried one of his designs on (won’t ever, of course, *deep sigh*) but they could be as lovely to wear as they are to look at, who knows.

Anyway why the excitement? And does it matter? Well, there certainly is some excitement, as before the exhibition even opens over 70,000 tickets have been sold. And does it matter? Well, in the overall scheme of things, of course not. But Alexander McQueen was beyond the ordinary and commonplace, and you just have to acknowledge those extraordinary people who inspire and enthuse future generations.

I shall say a lot more when I visit but, for the moment, I’ve been thinking about what I should wear on the day I visit the exhibition. Sorry to be so vacuous and shallow but any excuse to dress up, and if ever there was a good excuse to do that, this is one.

Here below is one outfit I might wear. The hat was bought at Urban Outfitters and featured earlier this year, other clothes are all charity shop buys.

hat-and-outfit-web3

And here’s another outfit, which might be the one.

hat-and-outfit-web

But note what was worn at the preview.  I might have to think again about what I wear.  Maybe I’ll add some netting and feathers to my hat – what do you think!

That’s all for now

With love

Penny, the frugalfashionshopper

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14 thoughts on “Fashion genius Alexander McQueen

  • 14th March 2015 at 6:31 pm
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    Both outfits are truly lovely…but it will depend on the day…so the leather if it is cold and…well, the lighter jacket if not. Both those styles do suit you.

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      17th March 2015 at 8:19 am
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      Thank you Margaret, yes, the weather can be very variable in April – will see what I wear for a jacket nearer the time.

  • 14th March 2015 at 6:31 pm
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    Both outfits are truly lovely…but it will depend on the day…so the leather if it is cold and…well, the lighter jacket if not. Both those styles do suit you.

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      17th March 2015 at 8:19 am
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      Thank you Margaret, yes, the weather can be very variable in April – will see what I wear for a jacket nearer the time.

  • 16th March 2015 at 10:12 pm
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    Ooh, I’m going to the exhibition in May and have been wondering what to wear too! Shallow & vacuous, maybe, but then I long for the days when people dressed up to go to the theatre, opera, dinner so any excuse to wear something fun and not feel over-dressed! I agree, his work is like art and am so excited to be able to see the details up close. I love V&A exhibitions. I think your leather jacket with the layered net skirt would be a good combination – I like that tough and flirty mix. Look forward to your report back.

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      17th March 2015 at 8:23 am
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      So good to hear from another fan of the V&A. Their fashion collection is second to none – and what about the jewellery? I’ve been round that exhibition several times and gasp every time!

  • 16th March 2015 at 10:12 pm
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    Ooh, I’m going to the exhibition in May and have been wondering what to wear too! Shallow & vacuous, maybe, but then I long for the days when people dressed up to go to the theatre, opera, dinner so any excuse to wear something fun and not feel over-dressed! I agree, his work is like art and am so excited to be able to see the details up close. I love V&A exhibitions. I think your leather jacket with the layered net skirt would be a good combination – I like that tough and flirty mix. Look forward to your report back.

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      17th March 2015 at 8:23 am
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      So good to hear from another fan of the V&A. Their fashion collection is second to none – and what about the jewellery? I’ve been round that exhibition several times and gasp every time!

  • 22nd March 2015 at 3:47 pm
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    I think it is a very interesting trend that as a society we celebrate what people ‘do’ and ‘achieve’, rather than just who they naturally are. Alexander Mcqueen took his own life, so how many people took the time to see what was going on with him, compared to how many people adored the clothes he created? There are too many tragic examples of this where people are pushing them selves to the limits to be the best, and to please others, to get recognition and fame, but at the expense of a truly loving life. If this ‘great’ mans life ended with such sadness and desperation, then what is this showing us? Possibly we as a society are not celebrating and appreciating people for who they are, only what they do and how well they do it, which breeds more people desperate for this recognition and fame at the expense of truly looking after themselves. I think it will be an interesting exhibition to view considering the clothes as a reflection of what is going on with the person…

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      23rd March 2015 at 8:07 am
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      What an insightful and sensitive comment, Laura, and I mean sensitive to the man. Yes, we can say that people like Alexander McQueen fly too close to the sun and perish because of their genius, yet you wonder what support there really was for the actual man rather than his extraordinary designer’s eye? So sad. And actually I have thought to myself (but saying it now) that some of his clothes, as beautiful as they are, are quite uncomfortable to look at. I shall say more when I see them at the exhibition.

    • 5th April 2015 at 11:39 pm
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      Well said Laura, I felt we had missed the point entirely when one of our funniest men Robyn Wiliiams took his own life last year. What was going on that his sadness overcame him and there was no one to see how deep his pain was amd had been for such a long long time. What good did any of his many stints in rehab do when he ended up in such devastation that such an act was even possible? We don’t see the whole person, his suicide shocked us all, and so many lament the passing of the funny man, but don’t see what led to his demise. Being a celebrity is not ” it”. They are no happier or joyous with fame. It doesn’t protect them from the pain of life, and I susepct makes it worse, because where do you turn to when you find yourself rich, famous and ‘living the dream ‘ of having ‘ made it’ only to find its not the answer, it’s not satisfying and it’s not what you thought it would be? Celebrities and people at the top of their game are in the most lauded , envied positions and have nowhere to go when they realise how much it doesn’t deliver more than fleeting moments of satisfaction. They never escape the loneliness or sadness within, as they Prob think it shouldn’t be an issue now that they “have it all.” I think the biggest problem is that what truely sustains us as humans is not to be found in fame, and it probably eats away at them night and day that they got there and it’s not it.

  • 22nd March 2015 at 3:47 pm
    Permalink

    I think it is a very interesting trend that as a society we celebrate what people ‘do’ and ‘achieve’, rather than just who they naturally are. Alexander Mcqueen took his own life, so how many people took the time to see what was going on with him, compared to how many people adored the clothes he created? There are too many tragic examples of this where people are pushing them selves to the limits to be the best, and to please others, to get recognition and fame, but at the expense of a truly loving life. If this ‘great’ mans life ended with such sadness and desperation, then what is this showing us? Possibly we as a society are not celebrating and appreciating people for who they are, only what they do and how well they do it, which breeds more people desperate for this recognition and fame at the expense of truly looking after themselves. I think it will be an interesting exhibition to view considering the clothes as a reflection of what is going on with the person…

    • the frugal fashion shopper
      23rd March 2015 at 8:07 am
      Permalink

      What an insightful and sensitive comment, Laura, and I mean sensitive to the man. Yes, we can say that people like Alexander McQueen fly too close to the sun and perish because of their genius, yet you wonder what support there really was for the actual man rather than his extraordinary designer’s eye? So sad. And actually I have thought to myself (but saying it now) that some of his clothes, as beautiful as they are, are quite uncomfortable to look at. I shall say more when I see them at the exhibition.

    • 5th April 2015 at 11:39 pm
      Permalink

      Well said Laura, I felt we had missed the point entirely when one of our funniest men Robyn Wiliiams took his own life last year. What was going on that his sadness overcame him and there was no one to see how deep his pain was amd had been for such a long long time. What good did any of his many stints in rehab do when he ended up in such devastation that such an act was even possible? We don’t see the whole person, his suicide shocked us all, and so many lament the passing of the funny man, but don’t see what led to his demise. Being a celebrity is not ” it”. They are no happier or joyous with fame. It doesn’t protect them from the pain of life, and I susepct makes it worse, because where do you turn to when you find yourself rich, famous and ‘living the dream ‘ of having ‘ made it’ only to find its not the answer, it’s not satisfying and it’s not what you thought it would be? Celebrities and people at the top of their game are in the most lauded , envied positions and have nowhere to go when they realise how much it doesn’t deliver more than fleeting moments of satisfaction. They never escape the loneliness or sadness within, as they Prob think it shouldn’t be an issue now that they “have it all.” I think the biggest problem is that what truely sustains us as humans is not to be found in fame, and it probably eats away at them night and day that they got there and it’s not it.

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